Cloistered Dominican Nuns Corpus Christi Monastery

A Book, A Sword, and A Garden: The Rosary

2016-10-02-rosary-with-choir-angel

Take your Rosary: it is a book, a catechism, in which the profound mystery of the redemption of souls and their sanctification, is explained in fifteen* striking pictures, which are, at the same time, serious lessons.

Take your Rosary: it is a spiritual sword, with which you will victoriously fight against the enemies of the Faith, whether they be infidels, heretics, or indifferent.

Take your Rosary: it is a delightful garden where you may rest near Mary from the fatigues of life, breath the perfumed atmosphere of piety, and gather the fruits of every virtue.

Blessed be St. Dominic, who has bequeathed to us this gift of Heaven’s Queen, that we may share it with the whole world.  This is what the General Chapters continually recommend: “In each convent,” they say, “let there be chosen with the assistance of the Fathers of the Council, religious who are noted for prudence, devotion and piety, who may be the careful and assiduous propagators of a devotion so essential to us, and so useful to the faithful, in drawing down upon them the divine protection and in assisting them in extirpating vice.”  May these valiant Apostles of the Rosary multiply daily and preach by their word and example, by the pen and the fine arts.

Prayer: O Mary, delight of my soul, you are the book wherein is written the Word of life.  You are the picture wherein His is represented and explained to us (St. Catherine of Siena).

Practice: On the eve and on the day of the feast, pray the Rosary, visit the Rosary altar, join the Rosary Confraternity and invite others to do the same.  What a service you will render them!

From “Saints and Saintly Dominicans: Daily Reflections on Their Lives”, edited by Rev. Thomas a Kempis Reilly, O.P. (1915).

*After the publication of this material, Pope Saint John Paul II promulgated the five Luminous Mysteries, bringing the total number to twenty.

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